Tag Archives: books

Tao te Ching by Lao Tzu (tr. by Le Guin)

Tao Te ChingTao te Ching (pronounced Dow Day Jeeng), was written by Lao Tzu (Low-dsuh) and translated by Ursula K. Le Guin.

OK so there are tons of translations of the Tao te Ching, and while this one is not my favorite, the book itself is a wonderful way (haha, get it, Tao means “The Way”) to gain a more mindful approach at life. It is actually a collection of ancient poetry written more than 2500 years ago by a man attempting to lead people to a more mindful, meaningful way of life– one that is harmonious with the natural rhythms of the Earth. One of my favorite excerpts: “The Way never does anything, / and everything gets done… In stillness all under heaven rests” (p.37).

Peace & Love.

Availability: USMAI,
Review Submitted by: Jeanette Warren
Rating: Highly recommended
Challenge: A translated book.

Into The Water by Paula Hawkins

Into the Water

I liked Girl On A Train. This new novel from Paula Hawkins is in the same style, writing from multiple points of view, but in my opinion she took it too far this time. There are way too many characters and plot lines. Also the book jumps between centuries, and sometimes it doesn’t seem to start and stop in the same place. The book is OK. I would recommend it, but be prepared to pay very close attention.

Availability: COSMOS
Review Submitted by: Shelley Clark
Rating: Recommended
Challenge: Published in 2017

Never Let You Go by Chevy Stevens

Never Let You Go

This is the story of how love can become twisted and obsessive. I could hardly put it down. The first part of the book goes back from present day to previous day in the life of Lindsay, who escapes an abusive relationship, only to have her ex-husband find her. At the same time, suspicious things start happening that make her suspect her ex, Andrew is stalking her. The plot twists kept me guessing until the end. The story was well told and you also had the viewpoint of her daughter Sophie and her perspective. Really good read.

Availability:  COSMOS
Review Submitted by: Lynette Starke
Rating: Highly Recommended

Death at the Door by Carolyn Hart

Death at the Door

 

I’ve missed several in the Death on Demand Bookstore Mystery series, but luckily the main characters are steadfast and reliable. Max and Annie Darling set out to solve one murder after another in their island community, without the help of the usually dependable chief of police. One suspect after another falls by the wayside and the ending caught me pleasantly flat-footed.

Availability: COSMOS
Review Submitted by: Jane Kostenko
Rating: Must Read

The Te of Piglet by Benjamin Hoff

The Te of Piglet

The sequel to The Tao of Pooh, Te of Piglet does not capture the same essence of Taoism as its predecessor. The book reads pretty haphazardly, and I found it hard to follow. However, it does contain some nuggets of wisdom and purity, like this one: “If one wants positive results, one must be positive. Goodness persistently applied will always triumph over evil, even though it may seem to take a good deal of time doing so.” Therefore I recommend reading it with an open mind.

Peace & Love.

Availability: COSMOS, USMAI
Review Submitted by: Jeanette Warren
Rating: Recommended with reservations

Murder on the Serpentine by Anne Perry

Murder on the Serpentine

A new (2017) book in the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt series, this book finds our main characters on the cusp of many changes–worldwide and domestically. Written with the reliably steady hand of Anne Perry, the book captures and keeps your attention as the Pitts try to solve murder and mayhem at the Queen’s behest. Thoroughly enjoyable.

Availability: COSMOS
Review Submitted by: Jane Kostenko
Rating: Must Read
Challenge: A book published in 2017

Right Behind You by Lisa Gardner

Right Behind You
This book made me so happy to have Lisa Gardner bring back Quincy and Rainie! Even though the main characters is their foster daughter Sharlah, it still made me choose this book. It’s a fun read, and is the story of 13-year-old Sharlah and her brother, both in foster homes. Several years ago, her brother, Telly murdered their parents while protecting Sharlah from their drunken father, who had a knife. The story narration at times goes from Telly, to Sharlah’s point of view. It was a good read, but I started to see the plot about mid-way through. Make sure you read the Acknowledgements and learn about people who donated to be a character in the book, it’s always interesting.

Availability:  COSMOS
Review Submitted by: Lynette Starke
Rating: Recommended